Tokyo St. Patrick’s Day Parade’s 16 most Fascinating Floats/Performances

The first St. Patrick’s Day Parade in the Northern Hemisphere (and the largest parade in Asia), the St. Patrick’s Day Parade, Tokyo 2013, Sub Theme: Kizuna, took place on Sunday, March 17th 2013. With over 1,500 performers and 50,000 viewers (a large percentage of foreigners), it was quite a sight to see.

I already wrote a post about the costumes on the parade, but there’s more to a parade than just the costumes. There were entire performances that really made me feel like home.

For a while, I forgot I was in Japan.

Then the parade ended.

1. These people. Mostly because for the life of me, I couldn’t understand what “We love boys in green” is supposed to mean. I still don’t. IMG_90022. I talked about these dogs in my earlier post about the fun costumes from the Harajuku Omotesando 2013 St. Patrick’s Day Parade

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3. The bagpipes. Because let’s face it, no St. Patrick’s Day parade is complete without bagpipes. IMG_89684. The violinist  for three reasons. One, she was really good. Two, she was dancing while playing the violin. Three, it was cold outside – and look at her!

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5.The little school children from Fukushima (from the Tsunami, two years ago) playing instruments while marching.

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6. The little midgets. Mostly because I couldn’t (and still can’t) figure out where their eyes are. As I mentioned earlier, they gave me nightmares. I’d also like to take a moment and appriciate how awesome costumes in Japan always are.

Earlier, at the 2013 Tokyo Marathon, I got pictures of nearly 100 awesome costumes. People in Tokyo don’t slack off or joke around when it comes to costumes. I’m serious.

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7. The baton twirlers. They were good. They were even doing cartwheels while walking down Harajuku Omotesando street, and STILL caught their batons.

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8. This marching band. They got extra points for decorating their instruments.

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9. The cheerleaders. I feel like all St. Patrick’s Day parades (even in Tokyo), ought to have cheerleaders. And they were wearing the ICU (international christian university) school colors.

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10. Their costumes were cute. And they were dancing.

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11. Mostly because they were wearing samurai robes.

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12. The other baton twirlers. They were good, but I did see a couple slip-ups… However, it was still very impressive for a St. Patrick’s Day Parade in Tokyo.

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13. They had a couple floats like this. However, like the foreigner beside me said: “The real impressive thing would be if they were handing out free beer. Then I would cheer.”

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14.  The really energetic kid’s rugby team. IMG_9010

15. The only other traditional Japanese aspect of the 2013 Omotesando Harajuku St. Patrick’s Day Parade.

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16.  St. Patrick himself, not because he did anything, but because he was wearing a costume. And, later on, walking around Harajuku, we saw him again. He was still wearing his costume (bead and all). That deserves respect. IMG_8963

In any case, this post just focused on the “performances” or “floats” of the 2013 Omotesando Harajuku St. Patrick’s Day Parade Tokyo 2013, Sub-theme Kizuna. As always, I had fun just sitting on the sidelines of the parade.

If you want to read about (and see) the costumes from the parade, check out my earlier post.

Add me on Google Plus: +Grace Buchele

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7 responses to “Tokyo St. Patrick’s Day Parade’s 16 most Fascinating Floats/Performances

  1. Pingback: Tokyo Marathon 2013: From the Sidelines | Texan in Tokyo·

  2. Pingback: The 40 Best Costumes from Tokyo Marathon 2013 | Texan in Tokyo·

  3. Pingback: Tokyo Marathon 2013: Best and Worst Costumes | Texan in Tokyo·

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